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Evaluation of a bacterial algal control agent in tank-based experiments

Schmack, M., Chambers, J. and Dallas, S.ORCID: 0000-0003-4379-1482 (2012) Evaluation of a bacterial algal control agent in tank-based experiments. Water Research, 46 (7). pp. 2435-2444.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2012.02.026
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Abstract

A bacterial-based bioremediation product, LakeRelief™ by Novozymes (Waterguru LakeRelief, 2011), was tested in a series of experiments between October 2008 and March 2009 to evaluate its suitability as a short-term intervention technique to reduce algal blooms in the Swan-Canning River system. Results from fibreglass tank experiments (1100 L) suggested that the product did not actively attack and lyse algal cells. The product decreased NH 4 and NO x concentrations in treated tanks, both aerated and non-aerated. Product application decreased PO 4 concentrations in non-aerated tanks but not in aerated tanks. The product appeared to suppress algal growth in non-aerated tanks over short periods (several days). Algal growth regularly diminished after product application but reappeared shortly afterwards. Aeration had a negative effect on bacterial proliferation in the tanks, possibly through alteration of environmental conditions (e.g. water mixing). As a consequence of the environmental conditions in the tanks being counterproductive to the development of a representative microbial composition, several aspects regarding the product's effectiveness could not be assessed satisfactorily in the tank experiments. The importance of long-term nutrient immobilisation into a well developed food web and the subsequent nutrient removal through removal of the top order organisms is highlighted.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): School of Environmental Science
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2012 Elsevier BV
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7688
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