Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Motion palpation used as a postmanipulation assessment tool for monitoring end-feel improvement: A randomized controlled trial of test responsiveness

Lakhani, E., Nook, B., Haas, M. and Docrat, A. (2009) Motion palpation used as a postmanipulation assessment tool for monitoring end-feel improvement: A randomized controlled trial of test responsiveness. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 32 (7). pp. 549-555.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmpt.2009.08.004
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Objective: A tenet of motion palpation theory is the ability to confirm postadjustive segmental end-feel improvement (EFI). Only one previous trial has evaluated the responsiveness of EFI; this was a study of the thoracic spine. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of postadjustive end-feel for evaluating improvement in putative segmental spinal motion restriction after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) of the cervical spine. Methods: A prospective, blinded, randomized placebo-controlled pilot trial was conducted with 20 symptomatic and 10 asymptomatic participants recruited from a chiropractic teaching clinic. The treatment group received SMT, and the control group received placebo detuned ultrasound. Responsiveness was evaluated as the etiologic fraction (% of cases with EFI attributable to SMT) and as the sensitivity and specificity of change. Results: For the entire sample, the etiologic fraction was 63% (P = .002), sensitivity was 93%, and specificity was 67%. For symptomatic participants, a strong relationship appeared to exist between receiving SMT and EFI (etiologic fraction = 78%, P = .006; sensitivity = 90%; specificity = 80%). A strong relationship was not found for asymptomatic participants (etiologic fraction = 40%, P = .444; sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 40%), where EFI was recorded frequently, whether participants received SMT or detuned ultrasound. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that motion palpation of end-feel assessment appears to be a responsive postmanipulation assessment tool in the cervical spine for determining whether perceived motion restriction found before treatment improves after SMT. This observation may be limited to symptomatic participants.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Chiropractic and Sports Science
Publisher: Mosby Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7211
Item Control Page Item Control Page