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Accelerated low-intensity rTMS does not rescue anxiety behaviour or abnormal connectivity in young adult rats following chronic restraint stress

Hennessy, L.A., Seewoo, B.J., Jaeschke, L.A., Mackie, L.A., Figliomeni, A., Arena-Foster, Y., Etherington, S.J.ORCID: 0000-0002-6589-8793, Dunlop, S.A., Croarkin, P.E. and Rodger, J. (2022) Accelerated low-intensity rTMS does not rescue anxiety behaviour or abnormal connectivity in young adult rats following chronic restraint stress. Neuroimage: Reports, 2 (3). art. 100104.

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Free to read: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ynirp.2022.100104
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Abstract

Currently approved repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) protocols for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) involve once-daily (weekday) stimulation sessions, with 10 Hz or intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) frequencies, over 4–6 weeks. Recently, accelerated treatment protocols (multiple daily stimulation sessions for 1–2 weeks) have been increasingly studied to optimize rTMS treatments. Accelerated protocols might confer unique advantages for adolescents and young adults but there are many knowledge gaps related to dosing in this age group. Off-label, clinical practice frequently outpaces solid evidence as rigorous clinical trials require substantial time and resources. Murine models present an opportunity for high throughput dose finding studies to focus subsequent clinical trials in humans. This project investigated the brain and behavioural effects of an accelerated low-intensity rTMS (LI-rTMS) protocol in a young adult rodent model of chronic restraint stress (CRS). Depression and anxiety-related behaviours were induced in young adult male Sprague Dawley rats using the CRS model, followed by the 3-times-daily delivery of 10 Hz LI-rTMS, for two weeks. Behaviour was assessed using the Elevated Plus Maze and Forced Swim Test, and functional, chemical, and structural brain changes measured using magnetic resonance imaging techniques. CRS induced an agitated depression-like phenotype but therapeutic effects from the accelerated protocol were not detected. Our findings suggest that the age of rodents may impact response to CRS and LI-rTMS. Future studies should also examine higher intensities of rTMS and accelerated theta burst protocols.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier Inc.
Copyright: © 2022 The Authors.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/66521
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