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SSR markers in revealing extent of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among chickpea core collection accessions for Western Himalayas

Mir, A.H., Bhat, M.A., Fayaz, H., Wani, A.A., Dar, S.A., Maqbool, S., Yasin, M., Mir, J.I., Khan, M.A., Sofi, P.A., El-Sappah, A.H., Thudi, M., Varshney, R.K.ORCID: 0000-0002-4562-9131 and Mir, R.R. (2022) SSR markers in revealing extent of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among chickpea core collection accessions for Western Himalayas. Molecular Biology Reports .

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11033-022-07858-4
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Abstract

Background

The exploration of genetic diversity is the key source of germplasm conservation and potential to broaden its genetic base. The globally growing demand for chickpea suggests superior/climate-resilient varieties, which in turn necessitates the germplasm characterization to unravel underlying genetic variation.

Methodology and results

A chickpea core collection comprising of diverse 192 accessions which include cultivated Cicer arietinum, and wild C. reticulatum, C. echinospermum, and C. microphyllum species were investigated to analyze their genetic diversity and relationship, by assaying 33 unlinked simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The results amplified a total of 323 alleles (Na), ranging from 2 to 8 with an average of 4.25 alleles per locus. Expected heterozygosity (He) differed from 0.46 to 0.86 with an average of 0.68. Polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.73 to 0.98 with an average of 0.89. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that most of the variation was among individuals (87%). Cluster analysis resulted in the formation of four distinct clusters. Cluster I represented all cultivated and clusters II, III, and IV comprised a heterogeneous group of cultivated and wild chickpea accessions.

Conclusion

We report considerable diversity and greater resolving power of SSR markers for assessing variability and interrelationship among the chickpea accessions. The chickpea core is expected to be an efficient resource for breeders for broadening the chickpea genetic base and could be useful for selective breeding of desirable traits and in the identification of target genes for genomics-assisted breeding.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Centre for Crop and Food Innovation
State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre
Publisher: Springer Netherlands
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/65941
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