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Direct low field J-edited diffusional proton NMR spectroscopic measurement of COVID-19 inflammatory biomarkers in human serum

Nitschke, P., Lodge, S., Hall, D., Schaefer, H., Spraul, M., Embade, N., Millet, O., Holmes, E., Wist, J. and Nicholson, J.K. (2022) Direct low field J-edited diffusional proton NMR spectroscopic measurement of COVID-19 inflammatory biomarkers in human serum. The Analyst .

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Free to read: https://doi.org/10.1039/d2an01097f
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Abstract

A JEDI NMR pulse experiment incorporating relaxational, diffusional and J-modulation peak editing has been implemented for a low field (80 MHz proton resonance frequency) spectrometer system to measure quantitatively two recently discovered plasma markers of SARS-CoV-2 infection and general inflammation. JEDI spectra capture a unique signature of two biomarker signals from acetylated glycoproteins (Glyc) and the supramolecular phospholipid composite (SPC) signals that are relatively enhanced by the combination of relaxation, diffusion and J-editing properties of the JEDI experiment that strongly attenuate contributions from the other molecular species in plasma. The SPC/Glyc ratio data were essentially identical in the 600 MHz and 80 MHz spectra obtained (R2 = 0.97) and showed significantly different ratios for control (n = 28) versus SARS-CoV-2 positive patients (n = 29) (p = 5.2 × 10−8 and 3.7 × 10−8 respectively). Simplification of the sample preparation allows for data acquisition in a similar time frame to high field machines (∼4 min) and a high-throughput version with 1 min experiment time could be feasible. These data show that these newly discovered inflammatory biomarkers can be measured effectively on low field NMR instruments that do not not require housing in a complex laboratory environment, thus lowering the barrier to clinical translation of this diagnostic technology.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Australian National Phenome Centre
Centre for Computational and Systems Medicine
Publisher: The Royal Society of Chemistry
Copyright: © 2022 The Royal Society of Chemistry
United Nations SDGs: Goal 3: Good Health and Well-Being
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/65935
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