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Heat added to Repeated-Sprint training in hypoxia does not affect cycling performance

Dennis, M.C., Goods, P.S.R., Binnie, M.J., Girard, O., Wallman, K.E., Dawson, B.T. and Peeling, P. (2021) Heat added to Repeated-Sprint training in hypoxia does not affect cycling performance. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 16 (11). pp. 1640-1648.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2020-0676
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Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to assess the influence of graded air temperatures during repeated-sprint training in hypoxia (RSH) on performance and physiological responses. Methods: Ten well-trained athletes completed one familiarization and 4 experimental sessions at a simulated altitude of 3000 m (0.144 FIO2) above sea level. Air temperatures utilized across the 4 experimental sessions were 20°C, 25°C, 30°C, and 35°C (all 50% relative humidity). The participants performed 3 sets of 5 × 10 seconds “all-out” cycle sprints, with 20 seconds of active recovery between sprints and 5 minutes of active recovery between sets (recovery intensity = 120 W). Core temperature, skin temperature, pulse oxygen saturation, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, and thermal sensation were collected. Results: There were no differences between conditions for peak power, mean power, and total work in each set (P > .05). There were no condition × time interaction effects for any variables tested. The peak core temperature was highest at 30°C (38.06°C [0.31°C]). Overall, the pulse oxygen saturation was higher at 35°C than at 20°C (P < .001; d < 0.8), 25°C (P < .001; d = 1.12 ± 0.54, large), and 30°C (P < .001; d = 0.84 ± 0.53, large). Conclusion: Manipulating air temperature between 20°C and 35°C had no effect on performance or core temperature during a typical RSH session. However, the pulse oxygen saturation was preserved at 35°C, which may not be a desirable outcome for RSH interventions. The application of increased levels of ambient heat may require a different approach if augmenting the RSH stimulus is the desired outcome.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Copyright: © 2022 Human Kinetics
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/65386
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