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Hydrogen sulfide and/or ammonia reduces spermatozoa motility through AMPK/AKT related pathways

Zhao, Y., Zhang, W-D, Liu, X-Q, Zhang, P-F, Hao, Y-N, Li, L., Cheng, L., Shen, W., Tang, X-F, Min, L-J, Meng, Q-S, Wang, S-K, Yi, B. and Zhang, H. (2016) Hydrogen sulfide and/or ammonia reduces spermatozoa motility through AMPK/AKT related pathways. Scientific Reports, 6 (1). Art. 37884.

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Abstract

A number of emerging studies suggest that air pollutants such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and ammonia (NH3) may cause a decline in spermatozoa motility. The impact and underlying mechanisms are currently unknown. Boar spermatozoa (in vitro) and peripubertal male mice (in vivo) were exposed to H2S and/or NH3 to evaluate the impact on spermatozoa motility. Na2S and/or NH4Cl reduced the motility of boar spermatozoa in vitro. Na2S and/or NH4Cl disrupted multiple signaling pathways including decreasing Na+/K+ ATPase activity and protein kinase B (AKT) levels, activating Adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), and increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) to diminish boar spermatozoa motility. The increase in ROS might have activated PTEN, which in turn diminished AKT activation. The ATP deficiency (indicated by reduction in Na+/K+ ATPase activity), transforming growth factor (TGFβ) activated kinase-1 (TAK1) activation, and AKT deactivation stimulated AMPK, which caused a decline in boar spermatozoa motility. Simultaneously, the deactivation of AKT might play some role in the reduction of boar spermatozoa motility. Furthermore, Na2S and/or NH4Cl declined the motility of mouse spermatozoa without affecting mouse body weight gain in vivo. Findings of the present study suggest that H2S and/or NH3 are adversely associated with spermatozoa motility.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Springer Nature
Copyright: © 2016 The Authors.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/65304
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