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Cutaneous applied nano-ZnO reduce the ability of hair follicle stem cells to differentiate

Ge, W., Zhao, Y., Lai, F-N, Liu, J-C, Sun, Y-C, Wang, J-J, Cheng, S-F, Zhang, X-F, Sun, L-L, Li, L., Dyce, P.W. and Shen, W. (2017) Cutaneous applied nano-ZnO reduce the ability of hair follicle stem cells to differentiate. Nanotoxicology, 11 (4). pp. 465-474.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/17435390.2017.1310947
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Abstract

The ability of metal oxide nanoparticles to penetrate the skin has aroused a great deal of interest during the past decade due to concerns over the safety of topically applied sunscreens that contain physical UV-resistant metal particles, such as nano-Zinc oxide (nZnO). Previous studies demonstrate that metal oxide nanoparticles accumulate in skin furrows and hair follicles following topical application while little is known about the consequence of these nanoparticles on skin homeostasis. The current investigation tested the effects of nZnO (0.5 mg/day mouse) on hair follicle physiology. Topical application of Vaseline containing nZnO, bulk ZnO (bZnO), or ionized Zn to newborn mice vibrissa pad over a period of 7 consecutive days revealed that nZnO accumulated within hair follicles, and this induced the apoptosis of hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs). In vitro studies also indicated that nZnO exposure caused obvious DNA damage and induced apoptosis in HFSCs. Furthermore, it was found that nZnO exposure perturbed genes associated with HFSC apoptosis, cell communication, and differentiation. HFSCs transplantation assay demonstrated that the potential of HFSCs to differentiate was reduced. This investigation indicates a potential risk of topically applied ZnO nanoparticles on skin homeostasis.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/65302
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