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Microbiota from alginate oligosaccharide-dosed mice successfully mitigated small intestinal mucositis

Zhang, P., Liu, J., Xiong, B., Zhang, C., Kang, B., Gao, Y., Li, Z., Ge, W., Cheng, S., Hao, Y., Shen, W., Yu, S., Chen, L., Tang, X., Zhao, Y. and Zhang, H. (2020) Microbiota from alginate oligosaccharide-dosed mice successfully mitigated small intestinal mucositis. Microbiome, 8 (1). Art. 112.

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Abstract

Background

The increasing incidence of cancer and intestinal mucositis induced by chemotherapeutics are causing worldwide concern. Many approaches such as fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) have been used to minimize mucositis. However, it is still unknown whether FMT from a donor with beneficial gut microbiota results in more effective intestinal function in the recipient. Recently, we found that alginate oligosaccharides (AOS) benefit murine gut microbiota through increasing “beneficial” microbes to rescue busulfan induced mucositis.

Results

In the current investigation, FMT from AOS-dosed mice improved small intestine function over FMT from control mice through the recovery of gene expression and an increase in the levels of cell junction proteins. FMT from AOS-dosed mice showed superior benefits over FMT from control mice on recipient gut microbiotas through an increase in “beneficial” microbes such as Leuconostocaceae and recovery in blood metabolome. Furthermore, the correlation of gut microbiota and blood metabolites suggested that the “beneficial” microbe Lactobacillales helped with the recovery of blood metabolites, while the “harmful” microbe Mycoplasmatales did not.

Conclusion

The data confirm our hypothesis that FMT from a donor with superior microbes leads to a more profound recovery of small intestinal function. We propose that gut microbiota from naturally produced AOS-treated donor may be used to prevent small intestinal mucositis induced by chemotherapeutics or other factors in recipients.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd as part of Springer Nature
Copyright: © 2020 The Authors.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/65233
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