Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Aquaculture and urban marine structures facilitate native and non-indigenous species transfer through generation and accumulation of marine debris

Campbell, M.L., King, S., Heppenstall, L.D., van Gool, E., Martins, R. and Hewitt, C.L. (2017) Aquaculture and urban marine structures facilitate native and non-indigenous species transfer through generation and accumulation of marine debris. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 123 (1-2). pp. 304-312.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.08.040
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Both the invasion of non-indigenous marine species (NIMS) and the generation and accumulation of anthropogenic marine debris (AMD) are pervasive problems in coastal urban ecosystems. The biosecurity risks associated with AMD rafting NIMS have been described, but the role of aquaculture derived AMD has not yet been investigated as a biosecurity vector and pathway. This preliminary study targeted 27 beaches along the Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand, collecting debris from belt transects. Plastic (specifically plastic rope) was the dominant AMD present on beaches. The most common biofouling taxa were hydroids, bryozoans, algae and polychaetes, with one NIMS pest species, Sabella spallanzanii, detected fouling plastic rope. Our findings demonstrate that aquaculture is an AMD (plastic rope) generating activity that creates biosecurity risk by enhancing the spread of NIMS. The rafting of S. spallanzanii on AMD generated at aquaculture facilities is currently an unmanaged pathway within New Zealand that needs attention.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/64447
Item Control Page Item Control Page