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Implementation of a strategy to facilitate effective medical follow-up for Australian First Nations children hospitalised with lower respiratory tract infections: Study protocol

Schultz, A., Chang, A.B., Gill, F., Walker, R., Barwick, M., Munns, S., Cooper, M.N., Norman, R. and Laird, P. (2022) Implementation of a strategy to facilitate effective medical follow-up for Australian First Nations children hospitalised with lower respiratory tract infections: Study protocol. BMC Pulmonary Medicine, 22 (1). Art. 92.

Free to read: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12890-022-01878-3
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Abstract

Background
First Nations children hospitalised with acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) are at increased risk of future bronchiectasis (up to 15–19%) within 24-months post-hospitalisation. An identified predictive factor is persistent wet cough a month after hospitalisation and this is likely related to protracted bacterial bronchitis which can progress to bronchiectasis, if untreated. Thus, screening for, and optimally managing, persistent wet cough one-month post-hospitalisation potentially prevents bronchiectasis in First Nations’ children. Our study aims to improve the post-hospitalisation medical follow-up for First Nations children hospitalised with ALRIs and thus lead to improved respiratory health. We hypothesize that implementation of a strategy, conducted in a culturally secure manner, that is informed by barriers and facilitators identified by both parents and health care providers, will improve medical follow-up and management of First Nations children hospitalized with ALRIs.

Methods
Our trial is a multi-centre, pseudo-randomized stepped wedge design where the implementation of the strategy is tailored for each study site through a combined Participatory Action Research and implementation science approach informed by the Consolidated Framework of Implementation Research. Outcome measures will consist of three categories related to (i) health, (ii) economics and (iii) implementation. The primary outcome measure will be Cough-specific Quality of Life (PC-QoL). Outcomes will be measures at each study site/cluster in three different stages i.e., (i) nil-intervention control group, (ii) health information only control group and (iii) post-intervention group.

Discussion
If our hypothesis is correct, our study findings will translate to improved health outcomes (cough related quality of life) in children who have persistent wet cough a month after hospitalization for an ALRI.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Ngangk Yira Research Centre for Aboriginal Health and Social Equity
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd as part of Springer Nature
Copyright: © 2022 The Authors.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/64346
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