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The impact of different weed management systems on weed flora and dry biomass production of barley grown under various barley-based cropping systems

Naeem, M., Farooq, S. and Hussain, M. (2022) The impact of different weed management systems on weed flora and dry biomass production of barley grown under various barley-based cropping systems. Plants, 11 (6). Art. 718.

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Abstract

Weeds are among the major issues responsible for reduction in yield and profit in any crop production system. Herbicides are the easiest and quickest solution of weeds; however, their frequent use exert negative consequences on environment, human health, and results in the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed species. Due to these reasons, alternative weed management methods that are less harmful to environment and human health are needed. This two-year study evaluated the impact of different weed management options, i.e., false seedbed (FS), allelopathic water extracts (AWE), chemical control (CC), weed-free (WF) weedy-check (WC) on weed spectrum in various barley-based cropping systems, i.e., fallow-barley (FB), maize-barley (MB), cotton-barley (CB), mungbean-barley (M*B), and sorghum-barley (SB). Data relating to density, diversity, and biomass production of weed species prevailing in the studied cropping systems were recorded. Interactive effect of weed management methods and barley-based cropping systems significantly altered weed diversity, and densities of individual, broadleaved, and grassy weeds. A total 13 weed species (ten broadleaved and three grass) were recorded during both years of study. The highest dry biomass, diversity, and density of individual, broadleaved, and grassy weeds were noted in WC treatment, whereas WF treatment resulted in the lowest values of these traits. Chemical control resulted in the highest suppression of weed flora and improved dry biomass production of barley followed by AWE. The SB cropping system with CC or AWE resulted in the least weed flora. The M*B cropping system with CC or AWE produced the highest dry biomass of barley. It is concluded that including sorghum crop in rotation and applying AWE could suppress weeds comparable to herbicides. Similarly, including mungbean in rotation and applying AWE could increase dry biomass production of barley. In conclusion, herbicides can be replaced with an eco-friendly approach, i.e., allelopathy and inclusion of sorghum crop could be helpful in suppressing weed flora.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: MDPI
Copyright: © 2022 The Authors.
United Nations SDGs: Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/64223
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