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Segmenting Australian high school students utilising a Two-Step cluster analysis: Differential effects following the game on know alcohol program

Dietrich, T., Rundle-Thiele, S., Schuster, L., Drennan, J., Russell-Bennett, R., Leo, C. and Connor, J. (2016) Segmenting Australian high school students utilising a Two-Step cluster analysis: Differential effects following the game on know alcohol program. In: Petruzzellis, L. and Winer, R.S., (eds.) Rediscovering the Essentiality of Marketing. Springer, Cham, pp. 413-414.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29877-1_83
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Abstract

The majority of alcohol education programs in school settings follow a one-size-fits-all approach meaning that they are using the identical program (universal programs) for all participants (Botvin and Griffin 2007; Foxcroft and Tsertsvadze 2012). However, a one-size-fits-all approach may limit program effectiveness as large numbers of the audience may be left dissatisfied, uninterested, or unchallenged (Snyder et al. 2004). This study is part of a larger cluster randomised control design research project that is implementing and evaluating an alcohol social marketing education program named Game On: Know Alcohol (GOKA) that is currently in field.

TwoStep cluster analysis was conducted to segment 2114 Year 10 high school students using data from three segmentation bases; demographic, behaviour and psychographic. Three segments were identified: (1) Abstainers, (2) Bingers and (3) Moderate Drinkers. Next differential effects post-GOKA delivery were analysed using a (2) × 2 × 3 repeated measures ANCOVA design. Changes in knowledge, attitudes, behavioural intentions, social norms, expectancies and self-efficacy were investigated post-program delivery.

Strongest change effects for GOKA were achieved for the Bingers segment while the Moderate Drinkers and Abstainers had mixed results across the outcome measures. These findings warrant future development of more targeted and differentially delivered programs that meet the needs and wants of each of the identified segments.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation(s): College of Arts, Business, Law and Social Sciences
Publisher: Springer, Cham
Copyright: © 2016 Academy of Marketing Science
Other Information: Part of the Developments in Marketing Science: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Science book series (DMSPAMS)
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/64124
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