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J-Edited diffusional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurement of glycoprotein and supramolecular phospholipid biomarkers of inflammation in human serum

Nitschke, P., Lodge, S., Kimhofer, T., Masuda, R., Bong, S-H, Hall, D., Schäfer, H., Spraul, M., Pompe, N., Diercks, T., Bernardo-Seisdedos, G., Mato, J.M., Millet, O., Susic, D., Henry, A., El-Omar, E.M., Holmes, E., Lindon, J.C., Nicholson, J.K. and Wist, J. (2022) J-Edited diffusional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurement of glycoprotein and supramolecular phospholipid biomarkers of inflammation in human serum. Analytical Chemistry, 94 (2). pp. 1333-1341.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.1c04576
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Abstract

Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) N-acetyl signals (Glyc) from glycoproteins and supramolecular phospholipids composite peak (SPC) from phospholipid quaternary nitrogen methyls in subcompartments of lipoprotein particles) can give important systemic metabolic information, but their absolute quantification is compromised by overlap with interfering resonances from lipoprotein lipids themselves. We present a J-Edited DIffusional (JEDI) proton NMR spectroscopic approach to selectively augment signals from the inflammatory marker peaks Glyc and SPCs in blood serum NMR spectra, which enables direct integration of peaks associated with molecules found in specific compartments. We explore a range of pulse sequences that allow editing based on peak J-modulation, translational diffusion, and T2 relaxation time and validate them for untreated blood serum samples from SARS-CoV-2 infected patients (n = 116) as well as samples from healthy controls and pregnant women with physiological inflammation and hyperlipidemia (n = 631). The data show that JEDI is an improved approach to selectively investigate inflammatory signals in serum and may have widespread diagnostic applicability to disease states associated with systemic inflammation.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Australian National Phenome Center
Health Futures Institute
Publisher: American Chemical Society
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/63671
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