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Molecular and morphological diversity in Rhizoctonia bataticola isolates causing dry root rot of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) in India

Sharma, M., Ghosh, R., Krishnan, R.R., Nagamangala, U.N., Chamarthi, S.K., Varshney, R.K.ORCID: 0000-0002-4562-9131 and Pande, S. (2012) Molecular and morphological diversity in Rhizoctonia bataticola isolates causing dry root rot of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) in India. African Journal of Biotechnology, 11 (37). pp. 8949-8959.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.5897/AJB11.3657
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Abstract

Dry root rot caused by Rhizoctonia bataticola (Taub.) Butler. [Pycnidial stage: Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid] is emerging as a serious biotic constraint for chickpea production. To find out the diversity in R. bataticola populations in India, a total of 94 isolates collected from R. bataticola infected chickpea plants from different agro climatic regions of India were analyzed with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and different morphological properties. R. bataticola populations collected from different agro-ecological zones were very diverse in respect to their different cultural and morphological parameters like colony color, growth pattern, growth rate, mycelial characters, sclerotial initiation time, sclerotial intensity and morphology of the sclerotia. Five AFLP primer combinations provided a total 121 fragments. All fragments were found polymorphic with an average polymorphic information content value of 0.213. The dendrogram based on AFLP analysis showed that the maximum number of R. bataticola isolates were very diverse and did not depend on geographical origin. Both morphological and molecular data correlated each other and supported that the R. bataticola present in India were diverse and independent to their origin.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Academic Journals
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/63281
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