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Revisiting T-population derived from Tifrunner x GT-C20 for achieving high density genetic maps and detecting disease resistance QTLs in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

Guo, B., Pandey, M., Qiao, L., Wang, H., Culbreath, A., Varshney, R.ORCID: 0000-0002-4562-9131, Holbrook, C. and He, G. (2013) Revisiting T-population derived from Tifrunner x GT-C20 for achieving high density genetic maps and detecting disease resistance QTLs in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). In: 6th International Peanut Genomics Conference (AAGB-2013), 17 - 21 June 2013, Zhengzhou, China.

Abstract

Realizing the serious threats from Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and leaf spots (LS) to sustainable peanut production, high-density genetic linkage maps based on F2 and recombinant inbred line (RIL) T-population (Tifrunner × GT-C20) have been constructed and QTLs were identified in order to aid in marker-assisted breeding. Parental polymorphism survey and genotyping of 94 F2 individuals of T-population (TF2) resulted in the development of a dense genetic map (1,674.4 cM) with 318 marker loci (Wang et al. 2012) while another map was developed with 239 marker loci (1,213.4 cM) using a subset of RILs at F5:6 with 158 individuals from the same population (TRIL158) (Qin et al. 2012). Further, using the whole RIL population with 245 individuals, the third map (TRIL245) has been constructed with 159 marker loci (2261.9 cM, 20 LGs) so far along with continued improvement in marker numbers and genotyping by sequencing of a subset of 113RILs. QTL analysis using the three maps (TF2, TRIL158, TRIL245) and using multi-season phenotyping data (1 for thrips, 4 for TSWV and 10 for LS with at least 3 reps each) resulted in identification of two QTLs for thrips (12.14–19.43% PVE), 15 for TSWV (4.40–34.92% PVE) and 37 for LS (6.61–27.35% PVE) with TF2 map; one QTL for thrips (5.86% PVE), nine for TSWV (5.20–14.14% PVE) and 13 for LS (5.95–21.45% PVE) with TRIL158 map while six QTLs for TSWV (5.71–15.24% PVE) and 21 for LS (4.21–22.71% PVE) with TRIL245 map. Thus, this mapping population has shown great potential towards development of high dense genetic maps and identification of QTLs for important diseases such as TSWV and LS along with several other important traits.

Item Type: Conference Item
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/63136
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