Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Teachers’ perception of the use of mobile technologies with smart applications to enhance students’ thinking skills: a study among primary school teachers in Thailand

Khlaisang, J., Songkram, N., Huang, F. and Teo, T.ORCID: 0000-0002-7552-8497 (2021) Teachers’ perception of the use of mobile technologies with smart applications to enhance students’ thinking skills: a study among primary school teachers in Thailand. Interactive Learning Environments . pp. 1-22.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/10494820.2021.1993933
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

The current study examines antecedents to teachers’ behavioral intentions to use smart technologies in Thailand based on the technology acceptance model. 825 primary school teachers participated in a survey consisting of 11 constructs: perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude towards use, behavioral intention, peer influence, cognitive feedback, cognitive teaching belief, computer self-efficacy, perceived enjoyment, perceived ubiquity value, and personal innovativeness. The results suggested the proposed research model had a good model fit. 67.5% of variance in Thai teachers’ behavioral intentions was significantly associated with attitude towards use, perceived ubiquity value, cognitive teaching belief, and personal innovativeness. Attitude towards using mobile technologies was significantly associated with perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, perceived ubiquity value, and personal innovativeness. Perceived usefulness was significantly influenced by perceived ease of use, peer influence, cognitive teaching belief, and cognitive feedback. In addition, computer self-efficacy and perceived enjoyment significantly influenced Thai teachers’ perception of ease of use.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Education
Publisher: Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/62853
Item Control Page Item Control Page