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Accuracy and re-test reliability of mobile eye-tracking in Parkinson's disease and older adults

Stuart, S., Alcock, L., Godfrey, A., Lord, S., Rochester, L. and Galna, B.ORCID: 0000-0002-5890-1894 (2016) Accuracy and re-test reliability of mobile eye-tracking in Parkinson's disease and older adults. Medical Engineering and Physics, 38 (3). pp. 308-315.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medengphy.2015.12.001
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Abstract

Mobile eye-tracking is important for understanding the role of vision during real-world tasks in older adults (OA) and people with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, accuracy and reliability of such devices have not been established in these populations. We used a novel protocol to quantify accuracy and reliability of a mobile eye-tracker in OA and PD.

A mobile eye-tracker (Dikablis) measured the saccade amplitudes of 20 OA and 14 PD on two occasions. Participants made saccades between targets placed 5°, 10° and 15° apart. Impact of visual correction (glasses) on saccadic amplitude measurement was also investigated in 10 OA.

Saccade amplitude accuracy (median bias) was −1.21° but a wide range of bias (−7.73° to 5.81°) was seen in OA and PD, with large vertical saccades (15°) being least accurate. Reliability assessment showed a median difference between sessions of <1° for both groups, with poor to good relative agreement (Spearman rho: 0.14 to 0.85). Greater accuracy and reliability was observed in people without visual correction.

Saccade amplitude can be measured with variable accuracy and reliability using a mobile eye-tracker in OA and PD. Human, technological and study-specific protocol factors may introduce error and are discussed along with methodological recommendations.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Copyright: © 2015 IPEM
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/62844
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