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Effective nutrient removal and metabolite accumulation by C. vulgaris cultivated using digested food waste and brine

Giwa, A., Chalermthai, B., Moheimani, N.ORCID: 0000-0003-2310-4147 and Taher, H. (2021) Effective nutrient removal and metabolite accumulation by C. vulgaris cultivated using digested food waste and brine. Environmental Technology & Innovation, 24 . Art. 101935.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eti.2021.101935
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Abstract

Anaerobically digested food effluent (or liquefied food waste) was diluted with synthetic brine to prepare new media for cultivating Chlorella vulgaris. The media were prepared from different ratios of liquefied food waste and synthetic brine. These ratios were 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 and the media were named as CM2, CM3, and CM4, respectively. Johnson’s medium was employed as the control medium and it was named as CM1. C. vulgaris utilized more ammonium and phosphate from the new media than Johnson’s medium, although Johnson’s medium ensured higher carbon uptake. Compared to Johnson’s medium, the specific nitrogen removal by C. vulgaris cultivated using CM2, CM3, and CM4 was 89%, 81%, and 28% higher, respectively. The specific phosphorus removal by C. vulgaris cultivated using CM2, CM3, and CM4 was higher than that of Johnson’s medium by 137%, 75%, and 63%, respectively. Also, the increase in weight of C. vulgaris ensured by CM2, CM3, and CM4 was about 38%, 32%, and 30% respectively, higher than that of CM1. Consequently, the developed media ensured higher productivity and faster harvesting of C. vulgaris biomass than Johnson’s medium. Settling times of 11 min, 6.85 min, 7.08 min, and 7.4 min were required by CM1, CM2, CM3, and CM4 cultures, respectively, to achieve a clear supernatant volume of 25 mL. The metabolites accumulated by C. vulgaris biomass, which was cultivated using the new media, include proteins and carotenoids. Overall, liquefied food waste improved nutrient removal efficiency, settling time and osmoregulation whereas synthetic brine aided carotenoid synthesis.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Environmental and Conservation Sciences
Algae R&D Centre
Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems
Harry Butler Institute
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Copyright: © 2021 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/62789
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