Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Chemodiversity of dissolved organic matter and its molecular changes driven by rhizosphere activities in Fe Ore tailings undergoing Eco-Engineered pedogenesis

Wu, S., You, F., Boughton, B.ORCID: 0000-0001-6342-9814, Liu, Y., Nguyen, T.A.H., Wykes, J., Southam, G., Robertson, L.M., Chan, T-S, Lu, Y-R, Lutz, A., Yu, D., Yi, Q., Saha, N. and Huang, L. (2021) Chemodiversity of dissolved organic matter and its molecular changes driven by rhizosphere activities in Fe Ore tailings undergoing Eco-Engineered pedogenesis. Environmental Science & Technology, 55 (19). pp. 13045-13060.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.1c04527
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in soil structure and biogeochemical function development, which are fundamental for the eco-engineering of tailings-soil formation to underpin sustainable tailings rehabilitation. In the present study, we have characterized the DOM composition and its molecular changes in an alkaline Fe ore tailing primed with organic matter (OM) amendment and plant colonization. The results demonstrated that microbial OM decomposition dramatically increased DOM richness and average molecular weight, as well as its degree of unsaturation, aromaticity, and oxidation in the tailings. Plant colonization drove molecular shifts of DOM by depleting the unsaturated compounds with a high value of nominal oxidation state of carbon (NOSC), such as tannin-like and carboxyl-rich polycyclic-like compounds. This may be partially related to their sequestration by secondary Fe–Si minerals formed from rhizosphere-driven mineral weathering. Furthermore, the molecular shifts of DOM may have also resulted from plant-regulated microbial community changes, which further influenced DOM molecules through microbial–DOM interactions. These findings contribute to the understanding of DOM biogeochemistry and ecofunctionality in the tailings during early pedogenesis driven by OM input and pioneer plant/microbial colonization, providing an important basis for the development of strategies and technologies toward the eco-engineering of tailings-soil formation.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Australian National Phenome Center
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Copyright: © 2021 American Chemical Society
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/62553
Item Control Page Item Control Page