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Clinical characteristics of two‐hundred thirty‐two dogs (2006–2018) treated for suspected anaphylaxis in Perth, Western Australia

Turner, K., Boyd, C.ORCID: 0000-0003-1361-2148, Stander, N. and Smart, L.ORCID: 0000-0003-4776-2849 (2021) Clinical characteristics of two‐hundred thirty‐two dogs (2006–2018) treated for suspected anaphylaxis in Perth, Western Australia. Australian Veterinary Journal . Early View.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1111/avj.13114
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Abstract

Objective

To describe the clinical features of dogs treated for suspected anaphylaxis in Perth, Western Australia.

Design

Single-centre observational case series with retrospective and prospective phases.

Methods

This was a two-phase study of dogs with clinical suspicion of anaphylaxis presenting to the emergency service of a university teaching hospital. Dogs required evidence of, and appropriate treatment of, a type 1 hypersensitivity reaction as well as two or more organs affected (or cardiovascular signs alone) to be included. Phase 1 includes retrospective case series of 186 dogs (March 2006–December 2018). Phase 2 includes prospective descriptive case series of 46 dogs (October 2017–July 2018) focused on clinical signs.

Results

In phase 1, 88 (47%) dogs had evidence of insect exposure prior to the acute event. One hundred forty (75%) dogs had dermatological signs, 141 (76%) had gastrointestinal signs and 129 (69%) had cardiovascular signs. Ninety-two (49%) dogs had vasoconstrictive shock (5 with bradycardia), 24 (13%) had vasodilatory shock, 8 (4%) had mixed vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive shock and 5 (3%) had unclassifiable shock. On focused abdominal ultrasound, 42 of 71 (59%) dogs had gallbladder wall oedema and 3 of 71 (4%) dogs had peritoneal free fluid. In phase 2, the distributions of insect exposure, organ dysfunction and sonographic abnormalities were similar to phase 1.

Conclusion

Dogs presenting with suspected anaphylaxis showed a broad range of presentations. Dermatological signs were absent in a proportion of dogs, vasoconstrictive shock was more frequent than vasodilatory and unique features of shock were identified. This study highlights the challenges of diagnosis based on presenting features alone.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Copyright: © 2021 Australian Veterinary Association.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/62393
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