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Advances in molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in dogs and cats

Li, J., Ryan, U.ORCID: 0000-0003-2710-9324, Guo, Y., Feng, Y. and Xiao, L. (2021) Advances in molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in dogs and cats. International Journal for Parasitology, 51 (10). pp. 787-795.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpara.2021.03.002
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Abstract

The use of molecular tools has led to the identification of several zoonotic Cryptosporidium spp. in dogs and cats. Among them, Cryptosporidium canis and Cryptosporidium felis are dominant species causing canine and feline cryptosporidiosis, respectively. Some Cryptosporidium parvum infections have also been identified in both groups of animals. The identification of C. canis, C. felis and C. parvum in both pets and owners suggests the possible occurrence of zoonotic transmission of Cryptosporidium spp. between humans and pets. However, few cases of such concurrent infections have been reported. Thus, the cross-species transmission of Cryptosporidium spp. between dogs or cats and humans has long been a controversial issue. Recently developed subtyping tools for C. canis and C. felis should be very useful in identification of zoonotic transmission of both Cryptosporidium spp. Data generated using these tools have confirmed the occurrence of zoonotic transmission of these two Cryptosporidium spp. between owners and their pets, but have also shown the potential presence of host-adapted subtypes. Extensive usage of these subtyping tools in epidemiological studies of human cryptosporidiosis is needed for improved understanding of the importance of zoonotic transmission of Cryptosporidium spp. from pets.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Harry Butler Institute
Vector and Waterborne Pathogens Research Group
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Copyright: © 2021 Australian Society for Parasitology.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/62198
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