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Maternal psycho-social risk factors associated with maternal alcohol consumption and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: A systematic review

Ward, N., Correia, H.ORCID: 0000-0003-2717-2294 and McBride, N. (2021) Maternal psycho-social risk factors associated with maternal alcohol consumption and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: A systematic review. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics .

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-021-06206-4
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Abstract

Purpose

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a preventable range of neurocognitive disorders associated with the biological mother’s consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. However, on average, 45% of Australian women continue to consume alcohol during pregnancy resulting in a high rate of alcohol-exposed pregnancies and risk of FASD. This level of exposure is higher than the estimated global average of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (9.8%). This systematic literature review aims to identify demographic, health and psycho-social variables associated with alcohol consumption during pregnancy which may lead to FASD.

Methods

Using PRISMA principles, this systematic literature review reports on psycho-social factors which increase the risk of alcohol consumption during pregnancy thereby increasing the risk of FASD.

Results

Fourteen studies were accepted into this review. Studies were conducted across several countries and included a total of 386,067 cases. Seven studies were case-controlled and seven were cross-sectional design. Multiple studies identified the significance of prior mental illness, anxiety, depression, exposure to abuse and/or domestic violence and alcohol consumption behaviours of partners and family members as strong predictors of risky alcohol consumption during pregnancy and therefore associated risk of FASD.

Conclusion

Clinical services may be able to use the evidence-based findings from this review to improve assessment and treatment services for vulnerable women to reduce alcohol-exposed pregnancies.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Psychology, Counselling, Exercise Science and Chiropractic
Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright: © 2021 Springer Nature Switzerland AG.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/62101
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