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Presence of microplastics alone and co-existence with hydrochar unexpectedly mitigate ammonia volatilization from rice paddy soil and affect structure of soil microbiome

Feng, Y., Han, L., Li, D., Sun, M., Wang, X., Xue, L., Poinern, G., Feng, Y. and Xing, B. (2022) Presence of microplastics alone and co-existence with hydrochar unexpectedly mitigate ammonia volatilization from rice paddy soil and affect structure of soil microbiome. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 422 . Art. 126831.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2021.126831
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Abstract

Microplastics (MPs), as an emerging pollutant, may cause deleterious changes to the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystems. However, single impact of MPs and synergistic effects of MPs with hydrochar on ammonia (NH3) volatilization and soil microbiome in paddy fields has been largely unexplored. In this study, polyethylene (PE), polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and straw-derived hydrochar (HBC) were selected for observations in an entire rice cycle growth period. Results showed that under the condition of 0.5% (w/w) MPs concentration, presence of MPs alone and co-existence of MPs and HBC (MPs + HBC) unexpectedly mitigated cumulative NH3 volatilization from paddy soil compared with the control with no MPs or HBC addition. MPs + HBC increased NH3 volatilization by 37.8–46.2% compared with MPs alone, indicating that co-existence of MPs and HBC weaken the mitigation effect of MPs on NH3 volatilization. Additionally, results of nitrogen cycle related microorganisms closely related to NH3 volatilization demonstrated that MPs + HBC altered the bacterial community structure and species diversity. These findings provide an important opportunity to advance our understanding of the impacts of MPs in agricultural environment and soils, and provide a sound theoretical basis for rationalizing the application of HBC in soil with MPs.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education
Murdoch Applied Nanotechnology Research Group
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2021 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/61869
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