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Monochromatic light filters to enhance biomass and carotenoid productivities of Dunaliella salina in raceway ponds

Nwoba, E.G.ORCID: 0000-0003-0397-2369, Rohani, T., Raeisossadati, M., Vadiveloo, A.ORCID: 0000-0001-8886-5540, Bahri, P.A.ORCID: 0000-0003-4661-5644 and Moheimani, N.R.ORCID: 0000-0003-2310-4147 (2021) Monochromatic light filters to enhance biomass and carotenoid productivities of Dunaliella salina in raceway ponds. Bioresource Technology, 340 . Article 125689.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2021.125689
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Abstract

Monochromatic blue and red wavelengths are more efficient for light to algal biomass conversion than full-spectrum sunlight. In this study, monochromatic light filters were used to down-regulate natural sunlight to blue (400–520 nm) and red (600–700 nm) wavelengths to enhance biomass productivity of Dunaliella salina in outdoor raceway ponds. Growth indices such as cell size, pigment concentrations, biomass yield, photosynthetic efficiency, and major nutritional compositions were determined and compared against a control receiving unfiltered sunlight. Results showed that red light increased biomass productivity, lipid, and carotenoid contents but decreased cell volume, chlorophyll production, and cell weight. Conversely, blue light increased cell volume by 200%, cell weight by 68%, and enhanced chlorophyll a and protein contents by 35% and 51%, respectively, over red light. Compared to the control treatment, photoinhibition of D. salina cells at noon sunshine was decreased 60% by utilizing optical filters on the pond’s surface.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Engineering and Energy
Algae R&D Centre
Centre for Water, Energy and Waste
Harry Butler Institute
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2021 Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/61782
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