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Molecular phenomic approaches to deconvolving the systemic effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection and Post-acute COVID-19 syndrome

Nicholson, J.K. (2021) Molecular phenomic approaches to deconvolving the systemic effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection and Post-acute COVID-19 syndrome. Phenomics .

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Abstract

SARS COV-2 infection causes acute and frequently severe respiratory disease with associated multi-organ damage and systemic disturbances in many biochemical pathways. Metabolic phenotyping provides deep insights into the complex immunopathological problems that drive the resulting COVID-19 disease and is also a source of novel metrics for assessing patient recovery. A multiplatform metabolic phenotyping approach to studying the pathology and systemic metabolic sequelae of COVID-19 is considered here, together with a framework for assessing post-acute COVID-19 Syndrome (PACS) that is a major long-term health consequence for many patients. The sudden emergence of the disease presents a biological discovery challenge as we try to understand the pathological mechanisms of the disease and develop effective mitigation strategies. This requires technologies to measure objectively the extent and sub-phenotypes of the disease at the molecular level. Spectroscopic methods can reveal metabolic sub-phenotypes and new biomarkers that can be monitored during the acute disease phase and beyond. This approach is scalable and translatable to other pathologies and provides as an exemplar strategy for the investigation of other emergent zoonotic diseases with complex immunological drivers, multi-system involvements and diverse persistent symptoms.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Health Futures Institute
Publisher: Springer Nature
Copyright: © 2021 The Authors.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/61773
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