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Temporal location of High-Intensity interval training in cycling does not impact the time spent near maximal oxygen consumption

Mckee, J.R., Wall, B.A. and Peiffer, J.J.ORCID: 0000-0002-3331-1177 (2021) Temporal location of High-Intensity interval training in cycling does not impact the time spent near maximal oxygen consumption. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 16 (7). pp. 1029-1034.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2020-0354
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Abstract

Purpose: To examine the influence of temporal location of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) within a cycling session on the time spent ≥90% of maximal oxygen consumption and physiological and perceptual responses. Methods: In a randomized, crossover design, 16 trained cyclists (male, n = 13 and female, n = 3) completed three 90-minute cycling sessions with HIIT placed at the beginning, middle, or end of the session (13, 36, and 69 min, respectively). Intervals consisted of three 3-minute efforts at 90% of the power output associated with maximal oxygen consumption interspersed with 3 minutes of recovery. Oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, respiratory rate, and heart rate were recorded continuously during work intervals. Rate of perceived exertion was recorded at the end of work intervals, and sessional rate of perceived exertion was collected 20 minutes after session completion. Results: No differences were observed for mean oxygen consumption (P = .479) or time spent ≥90% maximal oxygen consumption (P = .753) between condition. The mean rate of perceived exertion of all intervals were greater in the Middle (P < .01, effect size = 0.83) and End (P < .05, effect size = 0.75) compared with Beginning conditions. Mean minute ventilation was greater in the End compared with Beginning condition (P = .015, effect size = 0.63). However, no differences in mean respiratory rate were observed between conditions (P = .297). Conclusions: Temporal location of HIIT has no impact on oxygen consumption or cardiovascular stress within a cycling session. However, HIIT performed later in the session resulted in higher ventilation, which may indicate the need for greater anaerobic contribution to these intervals.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Centre for Healthy Ageing
Murdoch Applied Sports Science Laboratory
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Copyright: © 2021 Human Kinetics
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/61374
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