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Curriculum frameworks

Hill, A., Readman, K. and Strampel, K. (2021) Curriculum frameworks. In: Hunt, L. and Chalmers, D., (eds.) University Teaching in Focus. Routledge as part of the Taylor and Francis Group, pp. 53-80.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003008330-4
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Abstract

Curriculum design in contemporary universities is an increasingly complex, but rewarding, task. Theories of curriculum from behaviourism to connectivism inform curriculum design and associated roles for teachers and students. These mirror theoretical advances in psychology, sociology and also the impact of technology. A myriad of competing priorities including industry and regulatory bodies also shape, both explicitly and implicitly, the possibilities for curriculum design. These external priorities are well balanced when there is a parallel commitment to inclusion, social justice and wellbeing, with consideration and knowledge of the diverse learners involved in the learning experience.

At a practical level, curriculum design requires an understanding of core principles such as cohesion, constructive alignment and assurance of learning. Phases of the curriculum lifecycle including design, approval and review are also essential to allow for ongoing renewal. Finally, evidence-informed models of curriculum design, including inquiry and experiential models, highlight the potential for active learner engagement, particularly when coupled with meaningful and sustained partnerships with industry, community, students, as well as colleagues within the university.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Vice Chancellery
Publisher: Routledge as part of the Taylor and Francis Group
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/61362
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