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Experiences from two ways of integrating Pre- and Post-course Multiple-choice assessment questions in educational events for surgeons

Ghidinelli, M., Cunningham, M., Monotti, I.C., Hindocha, N., Rickli, A., McVicar, I. and Glyde, M.ORCID: 0000-0003-1433-7694 (2021) Experiences from two ways of integrating Pre- and Post-course Multiple-choice assessment questions in educational events for surgeons. Journal of European CME, 10 (1). Art. 1918317.

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Abstract

To examine how to optimise the integration of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) for learning in continuing professional development (CPD) events in surgery, we implemented and evaluated two methods in two subspecialities over multiple years. The same 12 MCQs were administered pre- and post-event in 66 facial trauma courses. Two different sets of 10 MCQs were administered pre- and post-event in 21 small animal fracture courses. We performed standard psychometric tests on responses from participants who completed both the pre- and post-event assessment. The average difficulty index pre-course was 57% with a discrimination index of 0.20 for small animal fractures and 53% with a discrimination index of 0.15 for facial trauma. For the majority of the individual MCQs, the scores were between 30%-70% and the discrimination index was >0.10. The difficulty index post-course increased in both groups (to 75% and 62%). The pre-course MCQs resulted in an average score in the expected range for both formats suggesting they were appropriate for the intended level of difficulty and an appropriate pre-course learning activity. Post-course completion resulted in increased scores with both formats. Both delivery methods worked well in all regions and overall quality depends on applying a solid item development and validation process.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Veterinary Medicine
Publisher: Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
Copyright: © 2021 The Authors.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/61114
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