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The distribution, habitat preference and population dynamics of the pale field-rat (Rattus tunneyi) at Edel Land, Shark Bay, Western Australia: The role of refuges and refugia in population persistence

O'Neill, S., Short, J. and Calver, M.ORCID: 0000-0001-9082-2902 (2021) The distribution, habitat preference and population dynamics of the pale field-rat (Rattus tunneyi) at Edel Land, Shark Bay, Western Australia: The role of refuges and refugia in population persistence. Wildlife Research .

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Abstract

Context: The pale field-rat (Rattus tunneyi) is a small native rat that formerly had a wide distribution throughout Australia. It has suffered substantial range contraction since European settlement and is now largely absent from arid and semiarid Australia. In this biome, it was known to persist only at two Western Australian locations: Edel Land, on the south-western shore of Shark Bay, and islands off the Pilbara coast.

Aims: We aimed to establish the extent of the species range at Edel Land, its habitat preference, the temporal stability of its populations with respect to rainfall, and threats to its persistence.

Methods: We trapped at 54 sites to establish distribution and habitat preference, and re-trapped four of these sites at which R. tunneyi was present in each season for 2.5 years to establish trends in abundance.

Key results: Trapping resulted in the capture of 45 R. tunneyi individuals across 17 of 54 sites (4104 trap-nights; 1.1% capture success). Rattus tunneyi typically occupied localised areas of dense shrubland, often in habitats with free water or near-surface moisture from drainage from high dunes allowing denser and taller vegetation and, at some sites, year-round growth of grasses or rushes. Regular re-trapping of four sites in each season (2002 – 2004) suggested a declining population, probably owing to a sequence of dry years.

Key conclusions: Rattus tunneyi at Shark Bay occurred only in localised mesic refuges, apparently dependent on seepage from high dunes generated by major inputs of rainfall from infrequent cyclones or sequences of high-rainfall years.

Implications: This isolated population is likely to be threatened by browsing by feral goats, opening up otherwise densely vegetated habitats of refuge areas, and their trampling of R. tunneyi burrows; by the depletion of grasses from herbivory by European rabbits; and by the long-term impact of a drying climate. It is unlikely to persist without effective on-going management, particularly of the goat population.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Environmental and Conservation Sciences
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Copyright: © 2021 CSIRO
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/61105
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