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The effectiveness of EEG neurofeedback for executive functions (inhibition and updating of working memory) in children with neurodevelopmental disorders

Landes, Jasmin K. (2020) The effectiveness of EEG neurofeedback for executive functions (inhibition and updating of working memory) in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Masters by Research thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

There are currently no long-term interventions for children with neurodevelopmental disorders that address clinical symptoms without side-effects. EEG neurofeedback intervention has been tested as a novel clinical intervention for children with neurodevelopmental disorders. To date, however, the effectiveness of EEG neurofeedback intervention in improving cognitive performance has not been established. In the present study, therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials to examine the effectiveness of EEG neurofeedback specifically focusing on inhibitory and updating of working memory functioning in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. When EEG neurofeedback was compared with a sham EEG feedback group, a waitlist control group, or pharmacological intervention, EEG neurofeedback was more effective in decreasing the clinical symptom severity in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (e.g., a score for inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity combined; a score for hyperactivity-impulsivity only) and in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (i.e., social communication and interaction, as well as stereotyped behaviour). It is critical to note however, that all outcomes in the current study were rated at very low or low certainty of evidence via the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluations (GRADE) tool. These low and very low ratings mean that the reader cannot have full confidence that the favourable EEG neurofeedback findings represent the true effect. As a result, the effectiveness of EEG neurofeedback for inhibitory and updating of working memory functioning in children with ADHD and ASD needs to be interpreted with caution and more well-designed studies need to be conducted to provide suggestions for the intervention’s clinical use. In sum, these findings indicate that an insufficient amount of high-certainty evidence for EEG neurofeedback for inhibition and updating of working memory in children with ADHD and ASD is currently available. The evidence provided via the GRADE tool extended the existing EEG neurofeedback literature and provided recommendations for future studies.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters by Research)
Murdoch Affiliation(s): School of Psychology and Exercise Science
United Nations SDGs: Goal 3: Good Health and Well-Being
Supervisor(s): Fujiyama, Hakuei
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/60978
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