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A meta-analysis on the effectiveness of parent-based psychological interventions for primary paediatric chronic pain: A comparison between parent-only and parent-and-child interventions

Gunawardena, Eshani Dilhara (2019) A meta-analysis on the effectiveness of parent-based psychological interventions for primary paediatric chronic pain: A comparison between parent-only and parent-and-child interventions. Masters by Coursework thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

Based on increasing evidence in the area, parental involvement in therapies for children with chronic pain appear to be important. Due to apparent gaps within the existing literature, the present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of parent-based psychological interventions and determine whether the intervention efficacy varies as a function of degree of parental involvement, type of intervention and treatment modality. The current systematic study was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA statement. Four databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of psychological therapies that included parents of children with chronic pain. Risk of bias was evaluated and GRADE quality assessment was used to rate study quality. The systematic search yielded 17 studies consistent with the selection criteria involving 1391 parent-child dyads. A random effects meta-analysis found a statistically significant beneficial treatment effect for pain-intensity (g = -0.21) and parental emotional functioning (g = -0.24) at post-treatment. Effects for parental distress was maintained at follow-up, whilst effects for pain intensity was not observed at follow-up. Moderator analysis indicated that treatment type, degree of parental involvement and treatment modality were generally not significant moderators of intervention response. However, subgroup analysis indicated that combined interventions (in-person, online/phone) produced a significantly bigger pooled effect size than online-only interventions. Overall, findings suggest that parent-based psychological therapies for chronic pain may reduce pain intensity and improve parental emotional functioning. These results are considered within the context methodological limitations, as well as future research and clinical implications.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters by Coursework)
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Psychology, Counselling, Exercise Science and Chiropractic
United Nations SDGs: Goal 3: Good Health and Well-Being
Notes: Note to the author: If you would like to make your thesis openly available on Murdoch University Library's Research Repository, please contact: repository@murdoch.edu.au. Thank you.
Supervisor(s): Locke, Vance
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/60861
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