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Does Acceptance and Commitment Training increase psychological flexibility in the workplace: A systematic review

Cary, Nicola Karen (2020) Does Acceptance and Commitment Training increase psychological flexibility in the workplace: A systematic review. Masters by Coursework thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

This systematic review aims to examine the current evidence for the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in workplace contexts, termed ACT Training. Specifically, this paper examines the effect of ACT Training on improving Psychological Flexibility – the core construct in ACT – and its relationship to corporate outcome variables. Following the PRISMA format, extensive systematic searches of online databases were conducted, and evaluated according to specified criteria. The culmination of evidence offers positive support for both ACT Theory, and for ACT interventions increasing Psychological Flexibility in wide ranging international working contexts. Psychological Flexibility is associated with improved mental and general health, wellbeing, and other positive gains such as performance and job satisfaction. Findings indicate, when the effects of improved Psychological Flexibility are measured over the long-term, enduring positive effects are evident. This review highlighted methodological shortfalls, and important mediation and moderation findings. More complex analyses reveal that finer mechanisms are at play in the ACT model and need to be explored and conceptually expanded. The wide range of contexts and participants studied means these findings are not easily generalisable. However, these findings highlight the need for more robust and carefully designed methodological strategies in future, to facilitate effectual advancement of the research, and the upscaling of ACT interventions to meet current needs.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters by Coursework)
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Psychology, Counselling, Exercise Science and Chiropractic
United Nations SDGs: Goal 3: Good Health and Well-Being
Notes: Note to the author: If you would like to make your thesis openly available on Murdoch University Library's Research Repository, please contact: repository@murdoch.edu.au. Thank you.
Supervisor(s): Heritage, Brody
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/60858
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