Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Elecsys CSF biomarker immunoassays demonstrate concordance with amyloid-PET imaging

Doecke, J.D., Ward, L., Burnham, S.C., Villemagne, V.L., Li, Q-X, Collins, S., Fowler, C.J., Manuilova, E., Widmann, M., Rainey-Smith, S.R., Martins, R.N. and Masters, C.L. (2020) Elecsys CSF biomarker immunoassays demonstrate concordance with amyloid-PET imaging. Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, 12 (1). Art. 36.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (2MB) | Preview
Free to read: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13195-020-00595-5
*No subscription required

Abstract

Background

β-amyloid (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is currently the only Food and Drug Administration-approved method to support clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, numerous research studies support the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, as a cost-efficient, quick and equally valid method to define AD pathology.

Methods

Using automated Elecsys® assays (Roche Diagnostics) for Aβ (1–42) (Aβ42), Aβ (1–40) (Aβ40), total tau (tTau) and phosphorylated tau (181P) (pTau), we examined CSF samples from 202 participants of the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study of ageing cohort, to demonstrate the concordance with pathological AD via PET imaging.

Results

Ratios Aβ42/Aβ40, tTau/Aβ42 and pTau/Aβ42 had higher receiver operator characteristic—area under the curve (all 0.94), and greater concordance with Aβ-PET (overall percentage agreement ~ 90%), compared with individual biomarkers.

Conclusion

Strong concordance between CSF biomarkers and Aβ-PET status was observed overall, including for cognitively normal participants, further strengthening the association between these markers of AD neuropathological burden for both developmental research studies and for use in clinical trials.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Biomed Central
Copyright: © 2020 The Authors.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/60669
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year