Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Genotyping-by-sequencing and multilocation evaluation of two interspecific backcross populations identify QTLs for yield-related traits in pigeonpea

Saxena, R.K., Kale, S., Mir, R.R., Mallikarjuna, N., Yadav, P., Das, R.R., Molla, J., Sonnappa, M., Ghanta, A., Narasimhan, Y., Rathore, A., Kumar, C.V.S. and Varshney, R.K.ORCID: 0000-0002-4562-9131 (2020) Genotyping-by-sequencing and multilocation evaluation of two interspecific backcross populations identify QTLs for yield-related traits in pigeonpea. Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 133 (3). pp. 737-749.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00122-019-03504-z
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

This study has identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with nine yield-related traits in pigeonpea by using two backcross populations (BP) developed through interspecific crosses and evaluating them at two locations and 3 years. In both the populations, markers have shown strong segregation distortion; therefore, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping mixed model was used. A total of 86 QTLs explaining 12–21% phenotypic variation were detected in BP-1. On the other hand, 107 QTLs explaining 11–29% phenotypic variation were detected in BP-2. Although most QTLs were environment and trait specific, few stable and consistent QTLs were also detected. Interestingly, 11 QTLs in BP-2 were associated with more than one trait. Among these QTLs, eight QTLs associated with days to 50% flowering and days to 75% maturity were located on CcLG07. One SNP “S7_14185076” marker in BP-2 population has been found associated with four traits, namely days to 50% flowering, days to 75% maturity, primary branches per plant and secondary branches per plant with positive additive effect. Hence, the present study has not only identified QTLs for yield-related traits, but also discovered novel alleles from wild species, which can be used for improvement of traits through genomics-assisted breeding.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Copyright: © 2021 Springer Nature Switzerland AG.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/60183
Item Control Page Item Control Page