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Extracurricular activity participation in early adolescence predicts coping efficacy one year later

Heaslip, G.P., Davis, H. and Barber, B.L. (2021) Extracurricular activity participation in early adolescence predicts coping efficacy one year later. Australian Journal of Psychology . pp. 1-10.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/00049530.2021.1884000
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Abstract

Objective: Our research investigated whether extracurricular activity intensity in early adolescence predicted coping efficacy one year later. The study also tested whether activity participation intensity showed a linear or a nonlinear relationship with coping efficacy.

Method: Year 8 students (N = 1,162; M = 13 years; SD = .35) reported on extracurricular activities and coping efficacy, and repeated the survey in year 9.

Results: Greater sporting intensity predicted greater coping efficacy. In contrast, non-sporting activity intensity had a quadratic association with coping efficacy, suggesting that different types of activity participation might have different optimal patterns of participation. After controlling for gender, school SES, initial coping efficacy, and current activity participation, non-sporting activity intensity in grade 8 remained significantly associated (linearly and quadratically) with coping efficacy one year later.

Conclusion: Our results offer preliminary evidence that extracurricular activity participation in early adolescence predicts better coping efficacy. The quadratic results indicate that very high levels of activity participation may not be necessary to capitalize on the positive effects of activity participation.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Psychology, Counselling, Exercise Science and Chiropractic
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/59983
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