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Updates on the Morphometric Characterization of Indian Pangolin (Manis crassicaudata) in Sri Lanka

Algewatta, H.R., Perera, P., Karawita, H., Dayawansa, N., Manawadu, D. and Liyanage, M. (2020) Updates on the Morphometric Characterization of Indian Pangolin (Manis crassicaudata) in Sri Lanka. Animals, 11 (1). Art. 25.

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Abstract

An accurate morphological description and analysis based on reliable data are unavailable for the geographically isolated population of M. crassicaudata in Sri Lanka. This study provides the most updated morphological description of M. crassicaudata with special reference to body measurements directly obtained from 27 specimens collected island-wide. Morphological parameters were recorded under three age classes that were defined based on their body weight (BW) and total body length (TBL); juvenile (BW: <4.3 kg TBL: <56.0 cm), subadult (BW: 4.3–7.3 kg TBL: 56–101 cm), and adult (BW: >7.3 kg TBL: >101 cm) and gender to reveal sexual dimorphism based on morphometric parameters. The TBL of adult males ranged between 137 and 177 cm while body weight ranged between 20.4 and 48.8 kg. The average count of body scales was 511 ± 21. The body scales were found arranged in 13 longitudinal rows with the highest number of scales observed on the vertebral scale row (16 ± 1). Three major scale morphs were identified; broad rhombic scales, elongated kite-shaped scales, and folded shaped scales. Broad rhombic shaped scales was the dominant scale type (80.49%) on the body (405 ± 7). The tail-length to body-length ratio of an Indian pangolin was 0.87. The tail length of an Indian pangolin is a reliable predictor of the TBL and has potential implications in quick field data gathering.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Environmental and Conservation Sciences
Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
Copyright: © 2021 MDPI
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/59241
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