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Motivations towards exercise participation: Active persons with multiple sclerosis have greater self-directed and self-capable motivations

Learmonth, Y.C.ORCID: 0000-0002-4857-8480 and Heritage, B.ORCID: 0000-0002-6437-7232 (2020) Motivations towards exercise participation: Active persons with multiple sclerosis have greater self-directed and self-capable motivations. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . In Press.

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Embargoed until December 2021.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2020.10.138
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Abstract

Objective

To investigate differences in motivation perceptions towards exercise per Self Determination Theory and Theory of Planned Behaviour between active and insufficiently active persons with multiple sclerosis, given the well-being enhancements associated with exercise engagement for this population.

Design

Cross-sectional between-groups design where active persons ≥ 14 points on the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, and insufficiently active < 14.

Setting

Community setting in Australia.

Participants

Seventy Australian participants (Mean age = 49.61 years (SD= 12.79), FIM 64:6 , Patient Disability Disease Steps Median = 3).

Interventions

Not applicable.

Main Outcome Measures

Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, and adaptations of Self Determination Theory (autonomous and controlling forms of motivation) and Theory of Planned Behaviour (attitudes to exercise, subjective norms to exercise, behavioural control to exercise, and intention to exercise) items tailored towards exercise perceptions.

Results

Active persons perceived higher ratings in comparison to insufficiently active persons of autonomous motivations towards their exercise d = 0.85, in addition to positive attitudes towards the value of exercised = 1.28, their behavioural control over exercise d = 1.86, and their enhanced intentions to engage in exercise d = 1.14. All effect sizes were large (d > 0.80).

Conclusions

These findings suggest the value of considering ways of enhancing the perceived autonomy towards engaging in physical activity, in addition to the reduction of barriers towards participating and enhancing positive attitudes towards the value of physical activity, when practitioners are working with persons living with MS.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): Psychology, Counselling, Exercise Science and Chiropractic
Centre for Molecular Medicine and Innovative Therapeutics (CMMIT)
Publisher: Elsevier Inc.
Copyright: © 2020 Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/58952
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