Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Benefit of feeding dietary calcium and nonphytate phosphorus levels above National Research Council recommendations to tom turkeys in the growing-finishing phases

Roberson, K.D., Klunzinger, M.W. and Charbeneau, R.A. (2004) Benefit of feeding dietary calcium and nonphytate phosphorus levels above National Research Council recommendations to tom turkeys in the growing-finishing phases. Poultry Science, 83 (4). pp. 689-695.

Link to Published Version: http://ps.fass.org/content/83/4/689.abstract
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

This experiment evaluated the effects of feeding various dietary Ca and nonphytate P (nPP) levels to Large White male turkeys from 3 to 17 wk of age. After consuming a common prestarter diet, poults were fed approximate NRC (1994) levels of dietary Ca and nPP from 3 to 9 wk of age or levels approximately 25% higher. From 9 to 17 wk of age, each starter group was fed approximately 75 (low P), 100 (medium P), or 145% (high P) of the NRC (1994) requirements for Ca and nPP. Diets were fed as crumbles to 6 wk of age and as pellets from 6 to 17 wk of age. There were no effects on BW or feed efficiency to 9 wk of age. Litter P was increased by 21% when high Ca and nPP were fed from 3 to 9 wk. High dietary Ca and nPP fed during the growing-finishing period generally improved bone strength and ash. Tibia strength and ash were higher in the medium P group compared with in the low P group. Wing bone strength was greater in the high P group than in both the birds fed low or medium P. Litter P was increased by 23% when High P was fed in the growing-finishing period compared to the birds fed the Medium P diet during the same period. The results show there is a benefit to bone strength and mineralization when Ca and nPP are fed at levels higher than NRC (1994) recommendations.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Poultry Science Association
Copyright: 2004 Poultry Science Association
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/5854
Item Control Page Item Control Page