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An abattoir-based study on the prevalence of Salmonella fecal carriage and ESBL related antimicrobial resistance from culled adult dairy cows in Wuhan, China

Wang, J., Xue, K., Yi, P., Zhu, X., Peng, Q., Wang, Z., Peng, Y., Chen, Y., Robertson, I.D.ORCID: 0000-0002-4255-4752, Li, X., Guo, A. and Aleri, J.W. (2020) An abattoir-based study on the prevalence of Salmonella fecal carriage and ESBL related antimicrobial resistance from culled adult dairy cows in Wuhan, China. Pathogens, 9 (10). Article 853.

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to estimate the fecal carriage of Salmonella spp. among culled adult dairy cows presented to an abattoir in Wuhan, China and to evaluate their antimicrobial resistance profiles. Rectal swabs from 138 culled cows were cultured. Laboratory analysis involved the identification of Salmonella, the susceptibility assessment and the presence of Extended Spectrum β-lactamases and mcr genes in the isolates. An overall prevalence of Salmonella of 29.0% was recorded with 63.4% (26/41) and 2.4% (1/41) of the isolates identified as S. Typhimurium and S. Dublin, respectively. The occurrence of Salmonella was higher (odd ratios: 3.3) in culled cows originating from the northeast zone of China than cows originating from the central and north zones. Twenty multi-drug resistant strains (resistant to three or more antimicrobial agents) were detected (48.8%) and overall, a high resistance to ampicillin (36/41) and tetracycline (15/41) was observed. Extended Spectrum β-lactamases phenotypes were found in 7/41 isolates, of which all contained the blaCTX-M resistance gene, and no mcr genes were found by polymerase chain reaction. The high prevalence of Salmonella fecal carriage and antimicrobial resistance may contribute to an increased risk of Salmonella transmission to food.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Veterinary Medicine
Publisher: MDPI
Copyright: © 2020 by the authors
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/58372
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