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Self‐Regulation deficiency in predicting problematic use of mobile social networking apps: The role of media dependency

Liu, Z., Lin, X., Wang, X.ORCID: 0000-0002-1557-8265 and Wang, T. (2020) Self‐Regulation deficiency in predicting problematic use of mobile social networking apps: The role of media dependency. Decision Sciences . Early View.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1111/deci.12495
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Abstract

The problematic use of mobile social networking apps (SNAs) is an increasing issue in various places where people live and work. For example, employees’ use of mobile SNAs at work can result in significant loss of productivity. The literature has mainly focused on the etiology of problematic behavior with a focus on human psychological characteristics, whereas few studies have examined the role of technology media and problematic behavior. By integrating self‐regulation deficiency and media system dependency, this study investigates the drivers of problematic use of mobile SNAs by exploring users’ self‐regulation deficiency and its antecedents from a media dependency perspective. Data were collected from Chinese mobile SNA users via longitudinal surveys. The results show that self‐ and social‐oriented SNA dependency positively affect cognitive preoccupation and perceived irreplaceability, which in turn lead to users’ problematic use. We also compare the effect of SNA dependency across genders in the post‐hoc analysis. In the female group, self‐ and social‐oriented SNA dependency influenced problematic use through cognitive preoccupation and perceived irreplaceability. In the male group, self‐ and social‐oriented SNA dependency influenced problematic use only through their cognitive preoccupation. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Information Technology, Mathematics and Statistics
Publisher: Wiley
Copyright: © 2020 Decision Sciences Institute
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/58357
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