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An Intense, but ecologically valid, resistance exercise session does not alter growth factors associated with cognitive health

Marston, K.J., Brown, B.M.ORCID: 0000-0001-7927-2540, Rainey-Smith, S.R., Bird, S., Wijaya, L.K., Teo, S.Y.M., Martins, R.N. and Peiffer, J.J.ORCID: 0000-0002-3331-1177 (2020) An Intense, but ecologically valid, resistance exercise session does not alter growth factors associated with cognitive health. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 28 (4). pp. 605-612.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1123/japa.2019-0100
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Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to assess the acute changes in growth factors associated with cognitive health following two ecologically valid, intense resistance exercise sessions. Twenty-nine late-middle-aged adults performed one session of either (a) moderate-load resistance exercise or (b) high-load resistance exercise. Venous blood was collected prior to warm-up, immediately following exercise and 30 min following exercise. Serum was analyzed for brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Session intensity was determined by blood lactate concentration and session rating of perceived exertion. Postexercise blood lactate was greater following moderate-load when compared with high-load resistance exercise. Subjective session intensity was rated higher by the session rating of perceived exertion following moderate-load when compared with high-load resistance exercise. No differences were observed in serum growth factor levels between groups. Ecologically valid and intense moderate-load or high-load exercise methods do not alter serum growth factor levels in late-middle-aged adults.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Psychology, Counselling, Exercise Science and Chiropractic
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Copyright: © 2020 Human Kinetics
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/57270
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