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Sulfur management strategies to improve partial sulfur balance with irrigated peanut production on deep sands

Hoang, T.T.H., Do, D.T., Nguyen, H.N., Nguyen, V.B., Mann, S. and Bell, R.W.ORCID: 0000-0002-7756-3755 (2020) Sulfur management strategies to improve partial sulfur balance with irrigated peanut production on deep sands. Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science .

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Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/03650340.2020.1798412
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Abstract

Sands have favourable physical properties for harvesting peanut, but improving S and water use efficiency on these soils remains a challenge. We studied partial S balance in irrigated peanut crops on sands of Central Vietnam to identify key factors of S fertiliser management affecting S inputs and outputs. Field trials were conducted in the spring seasons of 2015 and 2016 to determine the effects of S application rates (0, 15, 30, 45 kg ha−1) on peanut yield and partial S balance. Sulfur balances were negative (-28.3 to 5.6 kg S ha−1) at rates < 30 kg S ha−1, while at higher rates of S fertiliser application that produced maximum pod yield (30 - 45 kg S ha−1), three of four sites showed neutral to slightly positive S balance (1.5 - 5.6 kg S ha−1). The negative partial S balance decreased with increasing S rates but was mostly attributable to the large S removal in peanut shoots (9.7 - 22.3 kg S ha−1) which are used on farms for animal feed. The negative partial S balance results in depletion of soil S reserves and hence efficient recycling of S on farms is critical for sustainable crop production on sands of VN.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/57132
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