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Seed skin grafts for reconstruction of distal limb defects in 15 dogs

Crowley, J.D., Hosgood, G. and Appelgrein, C. (2020) Seed skin grafts for reconstruction of distal limb defects in 15 dogs. Journal of Small Animal Practice . Early View.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1111/jsap.13187
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Abstract

Objectives

To report the surgical technique of seed skin grafting and clinical application for reconstruction of wounds on the distal limb of client‐owned dogs.
Materials and Methods

Medical records from The Animal Hospital at Murdoch University were retrospectively reviewed for dogs requiring reconstruction using seed grafting for distal limb skin defects between January 2009 and May 2020.

Results

Fifteen dogs were included. Grafting was performed on distal limb wounds at or below the carpus or tarsus, following trauma (n = 12) or neoplasia excision (n = 3). Complete epithelialisation with minimal contracture was recorded at a median of 4 weeks (range 3 to 8 weeks) after implantation. Median follow‐up was 37 months (range 3 to 55 months) after grafting. Postoperative complications included epidermal inclusion cyst in two dogs. Good functional outcome with acceptable cosmesis despite sparse hair growth was achieved in all cases.

Clinical Significance

Seed grafting is a simple technique that can be used reliably to reconstruct wounds on the distal limb in dogs where other reconstructive techniques are not suitable. Complete epithelialisation with sparse hair growth, good long‐term functional outcome and minimal complications can be expected.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Veterinary Medicine
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing
Copyright: © 2020 British Small Animal Veterinary Association
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/57119
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