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The feasibility and efficacy of a brief integrative treatment for adults with depression and/or anxiety: A randomized controlled trial

Lopresti, A.L.ORCID: 0000-0002-6409-7839, Smith, S.J., Metse, A.P.ORCID: 0000-0002-8641-1024, Foster, T. and Drummond, P.D. (2020) The feasibility and efficacy of a brief integrative treatment for adults with depression and/or anxiety: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine, 25 .

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and suitability of a brief integrative intervention, Personalized Integrative Therapy (PI Therapy), for the treatment of adult depression and/or anxiety. In this 6-week, 3-arm, parallel-group, randomized trial, PI Therapy delivered alone or with nutritional supplements (PI Therapy + Supps) was compared to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in 48 adults with depression and/or anxiety. All treatments were delivered as a 1-day workshop plus 6 weeks of reminder phone text messages to reinforce topics and skills covered in the workshop. Affective symptoms decreased significantly and to the same extent in all 3 conditions. At the end of treatment, 33% to 58% of participants reported levels of depressive symptoms in the normal range, and 50% to 58% reported nonclinical levels of anxiety. Compared to CBT and PI Therapy, PI Therapy + Supps was associated with significantly greater improvements in sleep quality. These findings suggest that a brief integrative intervention with or without supplements was comparable to CBT in reducing affective symptoms in adults with depression and/or anxiety. However, sleep quality improved only in the PI Therapy + Supps condition. These findings will require replication with a larger cohort.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Creative Media, Arts and Design
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Copyright: © 2020 The Authors
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/56902
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