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Multiple-element exposure and metabolic syndrome in Chinese adults: A case-control study based on the Beijing population health cohort

Zhang, W., Du, J., Li, H., Yang, Y., Cai, C., Gao, Q., Xing, Y., Shao, B. and Li, G. (2020) Multiple-element exposure and metabolic syndrome in Chinese adults: A case-control study based on the Beijing population health cohort. Environment International, 143 . Art. 105959.

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Abstract

Background

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients have a considerably increased risk for noncommunicable diseases, which poses a serious burden on public health. The effects of different elements on MetS have received increasing attention in the field of noncommunicable diseases over the past decade. These elements can exert adverse or favourable effects on human health by synergistic or antagonistic actions. Nevertheless, few studies have explored the relationship between multiple-element exposure and MetS.

Method

A total of 2095 MetS patients and 2039 controls free of major cardiovascular disease at baseline and follow-up visits were frequency matched for age (±5 years) and sex. The internal exposure levels of 15 elements in serum were investigated. Logistic regression models were employed to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of MetS for element concentrations categorized according to quartiles in the controls.

Result

Magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se), barium (Ba) and mercury (Hg) were significantly associated with MetS in the multi-element exposure model. The ORs for the extreme quartiles of Mg, Se, Ba, and Hg were 0.29 (95% CI: 0.23–0.37, P-trend < 0.001), 0.52 (95% CI: 0.42–0.65, P-trend < 0.001), 1.86 (95% CI: 1.51–2.28, P-trend < 0.001), and 2.61 (95% CI: 2.11–3.22, P-trend < 0.001), respectively. Ba may be antagonistic to Mg and Se in the human body.

Conclusions

Our study suggested that MetS was negatively associated with Mg and Se and positively associated with Ba and Hg. There were significant dose-response relationships between Mg, Se, Ba and Hg and the prevalence of MetS, suggesting that multiple elements may be involved in MetS.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Research and Innovation
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2020 The Author(s).
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/56896
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