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Genetic dissection of the interactions between semi-dwarfing genes sdw1 and ari-e and their effects on agronomic traits in a barley MAGIC population

Dang, V.H., Hill, C.B.ORCID: 0000-0002-6754-5553, Zhang, X-Q, Angessa, T.T., McFawn, L-A and Li, C. (2020) Genetic dissection of the interactions between semi-dwarfing genes sdw1 and ari-e and their effects on agronomic traits in a barley MAGIC population. Molecular Breeding, 40 (7). Art. 64.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11032-020-01145-5
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Abstract

The introduction of semi-dwarf cereal crop varieties in the 1960s enabled extensive increases in global food production. Semi-dwarf barley cultivars have shorter stature and improved stress resistance, grain yield and quality than tall varieties. The major semi-dwarf genes, sdw1 and ari-e, have been widely used in barley breeding programmes worldwide. In this study, we identified a novel sdw1 allele in cv. Lockyer and investigated the effect of sdw1 and ari-e and their interactions on plant height, flowering time and grain yield using a Multi-parent Advanced Generation Inter-cross (MAGIC) population generated from four elite barley cultivars. Allele-specific markers combined with Kompetitive Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (KASP) assays were used for fast and accurate screening of plants with different allele combinations. The results showed that the novel sdw1 allele from cv. Lockyer had similar effects on plant growth and phenology as the known sdw1.d allele. The two semi-dwarf genes sdw1 and ari-e had an additive effect for plant height with height reductions up to 27 cm. The ari-e gene triggered earlier flowering up to 6 days compared to WT and reduced the delay in flowering time caused by the sdw1 gene. The two semi-dwarf genes boosted grain yields by 20% in the sdw1 plants and up to 28% in plants with the two combined semi-dwarf genes. The results presented will benefit the development of higher-yielding and better-adapted barley cultivars.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Agricultural Sciences
Western Barley Genetics Alliance
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright: © 2020 Springer Nature B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/56568
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