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The burden of transboundary animal diseases and implications for health policy

Bruce, M.ORCID: 0000-0003-3176-2094, Bellet, C. and Rushton, J. (2019) The burden of transboundary animal diseases and implications for health policy. In: Kardjadj, M., Diallo, A. and Lancelot, R., (eds.) Transboundary Animal Diseases in Sahelian Africa and Connected Regions. Springer, pp. 11-30.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-25385-1_2
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Abstract

In Sahelian Africa and connected regions, the burden of transboundary animal diseases is poorly understood. This is due in part to the lack of robust estimates of the distribution and intensity of these diseases within the region. However, the problem is compounded by the complexity of the types of losses attributable to specific diseases, including the impact on human health of zoonotic transboundary diseases such as brucellosis and Rift Valley fever. There is also a balance between disease losses and the cost of our response to the presence or perceived threat of transboundary animal diseases. This chapter presents a framework for measuring the burden of transboundary animal diseases in the Sahel region, explores disease distribution data and collates what information is available on productivity losses and expenditure on disease mitigation, namely surveillance, prevention, control and treatment activities. We highlight the need for standardised data collection processes that capture disease loss estimates as well as expenditure related to our response. Reporting changes in losses and expenditure over time will provide a basis for making informed disease control policies for transboundary animal diseases. The outcome of this will be an evidence-base for mobilising resources in an efficient and effective manner.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation: Veterinary Medicine
Publisher: Springer
Copyright: © 2020 Springer Nature Switzerland AG.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/56509
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