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Sustainable green chemical synthesis of discrete, well-dispersed silver nanoparticles with bacteriostatic properties from carrot extracts aided by polyvinylpyrrolidone

Ghosh, P.R., Fawcett, D., Platten, M., Sharma, S.B., Fosu-Nyarko, J. and Poinern, G.E.J. (2020) Sustainable green chemical synthesis of discrete, well-dispersed silver nanoparticles with bacteriostatic properties from carrot extracts aided by polyvinylpyrrolidone. AIMS Materials Science, 7 (3). pp. 269-287.

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Free to read: https://doi.org/10.3934/matersci.2020.3.269
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Abstract

Large amounts of food products are disposed of around the world because they are below market standards. In Australia, low value, non-marketable carrots (Daucus carota) are ploughed into farmlands as green manure or are treated as waste. In recent years significant research interest has focused on developing waste valorisation strategies using new green chemistry-based sustainable processes. More importantly, strategies that also provide solutions for emerging challenges like the rising reports of resistance of bacteria to existing microbes are favourable. This study explored a facile synthesis process to reduce aqueous silver ions in aqueous carrot extracts to form silver nanoparticles that may have antibacterial properties. The synthesis process produced particles with surface plasmon resonance peaks typical of crystalline silver. The silver nanoparticles produced from pure carrot extracts were spherical and pseudo-spherical, 2 to 25 nm wide. However, with polyvinylpyrrolidone, much wider (10-50 nm), well-dispersed silver nanoparticles of various shapes including spherical, polygonal, rod-like and triangular types were produced. Several biomolecules which may act as reducing and capping agents for the process were identified; they included ascorbic, gallic and chlorogenic acids. The Ag nanoparticles produced significant zones of inhibition against the gram-negative E. coli and gram-positive S. epidermidis, indicating they had bacteriostatic properties. The study demonstrates that producing Ag nanoparticles with antibiotic properties from carrots is a good valorisation strategy because other uses for rejected carrot produce such as application as green manure may not be interrupted.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education
Engineering and Energy
Western Australian State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre
Publisher: AIMS Press
Copyright: © 2020 the Author(s)
United Nations SDGs: Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/56460
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