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Effects of a projector-based hybrid virtual reality on pain in young children with burn injuries during hydrotherapy sessions: A within-subject randomized crossover trial

Khadra, C., Ballard, A., Paquin, D., Cotes-Turpin, C., Hoffman, H.G., Perreault, I., Fortin, J-S, Bouchard, S., Théroux, J. and Le May, S. (2020) Effects of a projector-based hybrid virtual reality on pain in young children with burn injuries during hydrotherapy sessions: A within-subject randomized crossover trial. Burns . In Press.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2020.04.006
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Abstract

Aim

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a water-friendly Projector-Based Hybrid Virtual Reality (VR) dome environment combined with standard pharmacological treatment on pain in young children undergoing burn wound care in hydrotherapy.
Methods

This study was a prospective, within-subject crossover trial of 38 children aged 6 months to 7 years old (mean age = 1.8 years old). Each hydrotherapy procedure was divided into two equivalent wound care segments (No hybrid VR during one segment vs. Hybrid VR during the other segment, treatment order was randomized). Pain was measured using the 0–10 FLACC (Face, Legs, Activity, Cry Consolability scale) and the 0–10 NRS-obs (Numerical Rating Scale-obs).
Results

Projector-Based Hybrid VR significantly reduced procedural pain levels measured by the FLACC (p = 0.026) and significantly increased patients' comfort levels (p = 0.002). Patients' pain levels rated by the nurses using the NRS-obs were non-significant between both groups (p = 0.135). No side effects were reported.
Conclusion

Projector-Based Hybrid VR helped in reducing the pain related to hydrotherapy procedures in young children with burn wound injuries. This is the first study using virtual reality distraction with young children, and our findings are especially important because a large percentage of pediatric burn patients are very young. Additional research and development are recommended.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Health Professions
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2020 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/56006
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